Northwest Territories

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Aéroport d’Inuvik

BGC Engineering Inc. (BGC)  a été chargé par Transports Canada d’évaluer la vulnérabilité des aéroports du Nord aux changements climatiques.

Dans le cadre de ce mandat, une évaluation de la vulnérabilité aux changements climatiques a été réalisée pour l’aéroport Mike Zubko d’Inuvik, situé dans la zone de pergélisol continu des Territoires du Nord-Ouest.

L’ évaluation a porté sur les tendances climatiques prévues sur 30 ans dans la région d’Inuvik, tendances qui sont basées sur les données climatiques historiques et les modèles climatiques.

French

Inuvik Airport Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment

BGC Engineering Inc. (BGC) was retained by Transport Canada (TC) to carry out an assessment of northern airports and their vulnerability to climate change.

As part of this work a climate change vulnerability assessment was carried out for Inuvik’s Mike Zubko Airport located in the continuous permafrost zone of the Northwest Territories in Canada.

The assessment looked at a 30-year projected trends for the Inuvik region, which are based on historic climate data and climate projections using climate models.

English

Government of Northwest Territories - Highway 3 west of Yellowknife

The Public Infrastructure Engineering Vulnerability Committee (PIEVC) has developed a standardized protocol to assess the vulnerability of Canada’s public infrastructure to climate change. Case studies have been carried out to date across Canada, testing and calibrating this protocol on various infrastructures. This report presents the results of the case study undertaken for a 100 km section of Northwest Territories’ Highway 3 located between Behchoko (Rae-Edzo) and Yellowknife (km 240 to km 333).

French

Government of Northwest Territories Thermosyphon Foundations in Warm Permafrost

Passive cooling by means of pressured heat exchange pipes was developed in Alaska by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 1965 to preserve foundations in ‘warm’ permafrost. It has been widely applied in Alaska, northern Canada and Russia to preserve and cool permafrost. The original simple 20mm vertical pipe with a radiator in the air has evolved into other designs that include: thermopiles, sloped pipe thermosyphons and flat loop evaporator pipe (flat loop) thermosyphons.

French

Government of Northwest Territories - Highway 3 west of Yellowknife

The Public Infrastructure Engineering Vulnerability Committee (PIEVC) has developed a standardized protocol to assess the vulnerability of Canada’s public infrastructure to climate change. Case studies have been carried out to date across Canada, testing and calibrating this protocol on various infrastructures. This report presents the results of the case study undertaken for a 100 km section of Northwest Territories’ Highway 3 located between Behchoko (Rae-Edzo) and Yellowknife (km 240 to km 333).

English

Government of Northwest Territories Thermosyphon Foundations in Warm Permafrost

Passive cooling by means of pressured heat exchange pipes was developed in Alaska by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 1965 to preserve foundations in ‘warm’ permafrost. It has been widely applied in Alaska, northern Canada and Russia to preserve and cool permafrost. The original simple 20mm vertical pipe with a radiator in the air has evolved into other designs that include: thermopiles, sloped pipe thermosyphons and flat loop evaporator pipe (flat loop) thermosyphons.

English